Vivaldi – La Follia (La Folia), Voices of Music

Voices of Music presents “La Follia: A Baroque Pageant”, a beautiful performance of the 12th of Antonio Vivaldi’s Twelve Trio Sonatas, Op. 1. Sonata No. 12 in D minor “La Follia”, RV 63.

Antonio Vivaldi: La Follia (La Folia); Voices of Music, Robin Gilbert and Carlos Fittante, dancers

Choreographed and danced by baroque dancers Robin Gilbert and Carlos Fittante.

In 1705, eager to make his mark as a composer of both opera and instrumental music, the young Vivaldi published his first set of twelve trio sonatas as Opus 1. The last sonata, which is a highly virtuosic set of variations on the “La Follia” dance pattern (titled only “Follia” in the print), is one of his most famous works; Vivaldi takes Corelli’s variations on the same theme-and-bass pattern from Corelli’s Opus 5 (1700), which was already a famous work, and adds figuration of even greater complexity.

Choreography:

Carlos Fittante

Dancers:

Robin gilbert
Carlos Fittante

Costumes:

Carlos Fittante
Stephen Campos

Masks:

Jane Stein
based on baroque originals
carved by renu of singapadu, bali, indonesia

The Musicians and their Instruments

Carla Moore, baroque violin by Johann Georg Thir, Vienna, Austria, 1754
Katherine Kyme, baroque violin by Johann Gottlob Pfretzichner, Mittenwald, 1791
William Skeen, five string baroque cello, Anonymous, Italy, c1680
David Tayler, baroque guitar by John Rollins, after Jean Voboam, Paris, 1687
Hanneke van Proosdij, harpsichord by Joop Klinkhamer, Amsterdam (1996), after Ruckers-Goujon, Neuchâtel, Switzerland
Lid painting by Millicent Tomkins, marin, 2012.

La Folía (Spanish), also folies d’Espagne (French), Follies of Spain (English) or Follia (Italian), is one of the oldest European musical themes, or primary material, generally melodic, of a composition, on record. The theme exists in two versions, referred to as early and late folias, the earlier being faster.

Western classical music features both an “early Folia”, which can take different shapes, and the better-known “later Folia” (also known as “Follia” with double l in Italy, “Folies d’Espagne” in France, and “Faronel’s Ground” in England).

Sources

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