Accompanied by the Gimnazija Kranj Symphony Orchestra, the Slovenian clarinetist Nadja Drakslar performs Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Clarinet concerto in A major, K. 622. Conductor: Primož Zevnik. Recorded during the Gimnazija Kranj Great Christmas Concert, 2011.

Accompanied by the Gimnazija Kranj Symphony Orchestra, Nadja Drakslar performs Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Clarinet concerto in A major, K. 622. Conductor: Primož Zevnik.

Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto

Mozart wrote his clarinet concerto in 1791, shortly before his death, for the clarinetist and the composer’s close friend Anton Stadler (28 June 1753, Bruck an der Leitha – 15 June 1812, Vienna). It is one of Mozart’s latest works.

It consists of the usual three movements, in a fast–slow–fast form:

  1. Allegro (in A major and in sonata form)
  2. Adagio (in D major and in ternary form)
  3. Rondo: Allegro (in A major and in rondo form)
Anton Stadler
Anton Stadler (28 June 1753, Bruck an der Leitha – 15 June 1812, Vienna), the Austrian clarinet and basset horn player for whom Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote, amongst others, both his Clarinet Quintet (K 581) and Clarinet Concerto (K 622).

The concerto was written to be played on the basset clarinet, which can play lower notes than an ordinary clarinet, but after the death of Mozart, it was published with changes to the solo part to allow performance on conventional instruments. The manuscript score is lost, but from the latter part of the 20th century onwards many performances of the work have been given on basset clarinets in conjectural reconstructions of Mozart’s original.

Since there are no surviving instruments from Mozart’s lifetime. The oldest ones are from the early 19th century. What Anton Stadler’s instrument looked like, the instrument that Mozart saw, was not known for a long time. But, in 1992, an American musicologist discovered a drawing of Stadler’s basset clarinet in a program booklet for a concert that Stadler played when he was on tour in Riga, Latvia.

The instrument used by Stadler was invented and built by the Vienna K.K. court instrument maker Theodor Lotz around 1788.

Nadja DRAKSLAR PETRAČ

Clarinetist Nadja Drakslar Petrač studied clarinet at the Ljubljana Academy of Music in the class Ord. Prof. Alojza Zupana. She graduated with honors
in 2010.

She completed her Master’s degree at the Graz University of Arts (Kunstuniversitat Graz).

She graduated from Gerald Pachinger with an excellent grade in October 2013. During her studies, she regularly attended master classes of internationally renowned clarinetists including Mate Bekavac, Sharon Kam, Michel Lethiec, Philippe Berrod, and Stephen Williamson, and international summer of chamber music schools, performed in various chamber music schools ensembles. She also regularly prepared independent recitals and participated in various festivals and projects.

Nadja Drakslar plays Mozart - Clarinet Concerto
Accompanied by the Gimnazija Kranj Symphony Orchestra, the Slovenian clarinetist Nadja Drakslar performs Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Clarinet concerto in A major, K. 622. Conductor: Primož Zevnik. Recorded during the Gimnazija Kranj Great Christmas Concert, 2011.

After successful auditions, she also participated in several international orchestras, the most prestigious of which was the Pacific Music Festival Orchestra in Japan.

As a soloist, Nadja Drakslar Petrač performed as part of the concert subscription of the Academy of Music with the Symphony Orchestra of RTV Slovenia and the Orchestra SNG Opera and Ballet Ljubljana.

Her performance of Carl Weber’s Clarinet Concerto No. 2 in E♭ major, Op. 74 with the Symphony Orchestra of RTV Slovenia under the baton of conductor Rene Gulikers, in 2007 received a new award from the Academy of Music.

Now Nadja DRAKSLAR PETRAČ works as a clarinet professor at the School of Music Kočevje and the Litija Music School and devotes herself to her own sons.

Sources

M. Özgür Nevres

Published by M. Özgür Nevres

I am Özgür Nevres, a software engineer, an ex-road racing cyclist, and also an amateur musician. I opened andantemoderato.com to share my favorite music. I also take care of stray cats & dogs. Please consider supporting me on Patreon.

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6 Comments

  1. Please give more personal information on Nadja Drakslar and, if possible, more musical selections featuring her playing. She is fabulous!!

    1. I too would like to know a little more about this courageous young lady who has just 10% vision. Not only
      that nadjai has taken on board the nasty comments about her movements while playing. Nadja
      has answered her critics so lets hope that shuts them up. I am a member of a small appreciation
      group of European composers. For the first 2 years khatia buniatishvili won the title but this year
      the third we decided to put a cash value and guess who won by a mile—yes Dick Egan it was
      Nadja Drakslar. I need her e-mail address so I can forward her winnings,if you have I would be
      grateful. I am leaving mine

      1. I just wanted to say thank you for your support of Nadja Drakslar, and your critique of a person who said something that was overly critical and negative about her.

        I’m a 74 year old semi retired accountant living in Florida who has taken up a truly passionate interest in classical music…as a “tool” for me to use to help me to cope with my anger and frustration and anxiety during this tumultuous period of time we’re in right now. Part of that new hobby/interest of mine is to dive deep into all aspects of the music that I watch and listen to via
        my YouTube subscription. That Is usually a way to discover a series of interesting and diverse elements which, in turn, helps to build a kind of mental acuity and “structure” that further amplifies the music, its composer, the conductor and of course each of the members within the orchestra.

        Pardon this rather extensive comment. But I felt it was necessary since what you commented about brought tears to my eyes, and they’ve further added to my view of Nadja and my enjoyment of music.

        This world needs more people like you. Thank you for sharing your story. Feel free to comment on my response.

  2. Nadja is a lovely lady and an Extremely talented musician. I was sorry to learn she has limited vision. Of course she moves around when playing. All musicians do
    if they are passionate about the music.

  3. Quite a artist even for 77 year old music fancier. I don’t know a lot about the technical side of music but I know what I like.
    Nadia is great.
    Don’t know where she’s now but someone is getting blessed.
    Current schedule would be interesting.
    This Texan loves the archestra and her part .

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