Pavarotti – A Gala Concert (Munich 1986)

A Gala Concert by Luciano Pavarotti at Olympia Hall, Munich, Germany. Munich Radio Orchestra, conductor: Emerson Buckley. Year: 1986.

Programme

  1. 00:27 Rigoletto: Questa o quella (Giuseppe Verdi) (1)
  2. 02:47 Rigoletto: La donna è mobile (Giuseppe Verdi) (2)
  3. 05:23 L’Arlesiana: E la solita storia… Anch’io vorrei “Lamento” (Francesco Cilèa) (3)
  4. 10:46 Mamma (Cesare Andrea Bixio) (4)
  5. 15:15 Rondine al nido (Vincenzo di Crescenzo) (5)
  6. 20:14 Lolita “Spanish Serenade” (Arturo Buzzi-Peccia) (6)
  7. 23:34 Fedora: Amor ti vieta (Umberto Giordano) (7)
  8. 26:09 I Pagliacci: Recitar!… Vesti la giubba (Ruggero Leoncavallo) (8)
  9. 29:58 Chitarra Romana (Eldo Di Lazzaro) (9)
  10. 33:43 La mia canzone al vento (Cesare Andrea Bixio) (10)
  11. 37:28 Non ti scordar di me (Ernesto De Curtis) (11)
  12. 43:54 Manon Lescaut: Donna non vidi mai (Giacomo Puccini) (12)
  13. 48:24 O sole mio (Eduardo Di Capua) (13)
  14. 53:10 Torna a Surriento (Ernesto De Curtis) (14)

Notes

  1. Rigoletto is an opera in three acts by Giuseppe Verdi. The Italian libretto was written by Francesco Maria Piave based on the play Le roi s’amuse by Victor Hugo. Despite serious initial problems with the Austrian censors who had control over northern Italian theatres at the time, the opera had a triumphant premiere at La Fenice in Venice on 11 March 1851.

    Questa o quella

    Questa o quella per me pari sono
    a quant’ altre d’ intorno mi vedo,
    del mio core l’ impero non cedo
    meglio ad una che ad altre beltà
    La costoro avvenenza è qual dono
    di che il fato ne infiora la vita
    s’ oggi questa mi torna gradita
    forse un’ altra doman lo sarà.
    La costanza tiranna delcore
    detestiamo qual morbo crudele,
    sol chi vuole si serbi fedele;
    Non v’ha amor se non v’è libertà.
    De’ i mariti il geloso furore,
    degli amanti le smanie derido,
    anco d’ Argo i cent’occhi disfido
    se mi punge una qualche beltà.

    This or that

    This girl or that girl are equal
    to the all the others I see around me,
    the core of my being I will not yield
    to one beauty or another
    their attractiveness is what they are gifted
    from fate and embellishes life
    Perhaps today this girl welcomes me
    perhaps tomorrow another girl will demand me.
    Constancy is a tyrant to the heart
    it is a hated cruel disease to
    only those who want you to be faithful;
    There can be no love if there is no freedom.
    Husbands’ jealous rage,
    lovers’ woes I despise,
    I defy the hundred eyes of Argo
    if I fancy a few beauties.

  2. “La donna è mobile” (English: The woman is fickle) is the Duke of Mantua’s canzone from the beginning of act 3 of Giuseppe Verdi’s opera Rigoletto (1851). The inherent irony is that the Duke, a callous playboy, is the one who is mobile (“inconstant”). Its reprise towards the end of the opera is chilling, as Rigoletto realizes from the sound of the Duke’s lively voice coming from within the tavern (offstage), that the body in the sack over which he has grimly triumphed is not that of the Duke after all: Rigoletto had paid Sparafucile, an assassin, to kill the Duke but Sparafucile deceived him by killing Gilda, Rigoletto’s beloved daughter, instead. The canzone is famous as a showcase for tenors. Raffaele Mirate’s performance of the bravura aria at the opera’s 1851 premiere was hailed as the highlight of the evening. Before its first public performance (in Venice), it was rehearsed under tight secrecy: a necessary precaution, because it proved to be catchy and soon after its first public performance every gondolier in Venice was singing it.

    La donna è mobile

    1. La donna è mobile
    Qual piuma al vento,
    muta d’accento
    e di pensiero.

    Sempre un amabile,
    leggiadro viso,
    in pianto o in riso,
    è menzognero.

    Refrain
    La donna è mobil’.
    Qual piuma al vento,
    muta d’accento
    e di pensier’!

    2. È sempre misero
    chi a lei s’affida,
    chi le confida
    mal cauto il cuore!

    Pur mai non sentesi
    felice appieno
    chi su quel seno
    non liba amore!

    Refrain
    La donna è mobil’
    Qual piuma al vento,
    muta d’accento
    e di pensier’!

    The woman is fickle

    Woman is flighty.
    Like a feather in the wind,
    she changes in voice
    and in thought.

    Always a lovely,
    pretty face,
    in tears or in laughter,
    it’s untrue.

    Refrain
    Woman is flighty.
    like a feather in the wind,
    she changes in voice
    and in thought!

    Always miserable
    is he who trusts her,
    he who confides in her
    his unwary heart!

    Yet one never feels
    fully happy
    who from that bosom
    does not drink love!

    Refrain
    Woman is flighty.
    Like a feather in the wind,
    she changes her words,
    and her thoughts!

  3. The “Lamento di Federico”, “È la solita storia del pastore”, is a famous aria taken from act II of the opera L’arlesiana by Francesco Cilea. It is sung by Federico, who is deeply in love with a girl from Arles, the Arlesiana of the title, but his family has arranged his marriage with Vivetta. Vivetta has always loved Federico since childhood and is disappointed to know of his love for l’Arlesiana. When he has been left alone, Federico reads the letters of l’Arlesiana and ponders them with his broken heart.

    Italian

    È la solita storia del pastore…
    Il povero ragazzo voleva raccontarla
    E s’addormì.
    C’è nel sonno l’oblio.
    Come l’invidio!
    Anch’io vorrei dormir così,
    nel sonno almen l’oblio trovar!
    La pace sol cercando io vo’.
    Vorrei poter tutto scordar!
    Ma ogni sforzo è vano.
    Davanti ho sempre
    di lei il dolce sembiante.
    La pace tolta è solo a me.
    Perché degg’io tanto penar?
    Lei! Sempre lei mi parla al cor!
    Fatale vision, mi lascia!
    Mi fai tanto male! Ahimè!

    English translation

    It’s the old tale of the shepherd…
    The poor boy wanted to retell it
    And he fell asleep.
    There is oblivion in sleep.
    How I envy him!
    I too would like to sleep like that
    To find oblivion at least in slumber!
    I am searching only for peace.
    I would like to be able to forget everything!
    Yet every effort is in vain.
    Before me I always have
    her sweet face.
    Peace is ever taken from me.
    Why must I suffer so very much?
    She, as always speaks to my heart.
    Fatal vision, leave me!
    You hurt me so deeply! Alas!

  4. “Mamma” is a popular song first written in 1941 by Cesare Andrea Bixio with Italian lyrics by Bixio Cherubini under the title “Mamma son tanto felice” (Mum, I am so happy). Cesare Andrea Bixio (11 October 1896 – 5 March 1978) was an Italian composer. He was one of the most popular Italian songwriters of the 1930s, ’40s, and ’50s. The performers of this song included: Beniamino Gigli, Luciano Tajoli, Richard Tucker, Claudio Villa, Robertino Loreti, Violetta Villas, Muslim Mogomayev, Luciano Pavarotti, Toto Cutugno, Andrea Bocelli, Sergio Franchi, Romina Arena, and Mario Frangoulis. In 1946, the English lyrics were written by Harold Barlow and Phil Brito who had their popular recording hit the charts in May 1946.

    Mamma

    Mamma, son tanto felice
    Perche ritorno da te
    La mia canzone ti dice
    Ch’ il pi bel sogno per me
    Mamma son tanto felice
    Viver lontano perche

    Mamma, solo per te la mia canzone vola
    Mamma, sarai con me, tu non sarai piu’ sola
    Quanto ti voglio bene
    Queste parole d’amore che ti sospira il mio cuore
    Forse non s’usano piu

    Mamma
    Ma la canzone mia pi bella sei tu
    Sei tu la vita
    E per la vita non ti lascio mai piu

    Sento la mano tua stanca
    Cerca i miei riccioli d’or
    Sento, e la voce ti manca
    La ninna nanna d’allor
    Oggi la testa tua bianca
    Io voglio stringere al cuor

    Mamma, solo per te la mia canzone vola
    Mamma, sarai con me, tu non sarai pi sola
    Quanto ti voglio bene
    Queste parole d’amore che ti sospira il mio cuore
    Forse non s’usano piu’

    Mamma
    Ma la canzone mia piu’ bella sei tu
    Sei tu la vita
    E per la vita non ti lascio mai piu’
    Mamma mai piu’

    English translation

    Mom I am very happy
    because I am returning to you
    my song is telling you
    that it is the most beautiful day for me
    mom I am very happy
    why should we live apart?

    Mom, only for you
    my song flies
    mom, you will stay with me
    you’ll not be alone anymore
    how much I love you
    these words of love
    that my heart is whispering to you
    maybe are not longer used

    Mom, but my most beautiful song is you
    you are my life
    and for the rest of my life I’ll never leave you again

    I can feel your tired hand
    looking for my golden curls
    I can hear, and your voice is a whisper
    the lullaby of back then
    today, your white head
    I want to hold tight to my heart.

  5. Rondine al nido is a beautiful romance and one of the best known works of the Italian composer Vincenzo de Crescenzo, whose music was in the repertoire of Enrico Caruso, Beniamino Gigli, Tito Schipa, Giuseppe Di Stefano, Richard Tucker, Luciano Pavarotti, Luigi Infantino, Ramón Vargas, Robert Dean Smith, Francesco Albanese, among many others. Written by de Crescenzo in the early 20th century (circa 1920), it deals with lost love. While written and performed as a Neapolitan song, but with lyrics in Italian, it is more like an aria of the late Romantic period, demanding of the singer high intensity, high notes, and excellent breath control. It begins calmly and lightly, and then it becomes a passionate outburst. The second stanza repeats this scheme. The song was sung by tenor Agostino Castagnola as The Doctor (EMH) portrayed by Robert Picardo in the 13th episode, Virtuoso, of the sixth season of the science fiction television series Star Trek: Voyager. The episode was first aired on 26 January 2000 in the United States. The song is performed in Las Vegas at the Bellagio’s fountain, which dances to Luciano Pavarotti’s version of the song. Every performer interprets the song in his own way and there have been several changes from version to version. The following version is from the booklet of the 1990 album, Carreras Domingo Pavarotti in Concert.

    Italian

    I
    Sotto la gronda de la torre antica
    Una rondine amica,
    Allo sbocciare del mandorlo è tornata.
    Ritorna tutti gli anni,
    Sempre alla stessa data,
    Monti e mare essa varca
    per tornar.
    Solo amore
    Quando fugge e va lontano
    Speri invano
    ma non torna più,
    Speri invano
    Ma non torna più.

    II
    Ne la penombra dolce della sera
    Passa la primavera.
    Cinguettano le rondini nel volo,
    Ebbre di luce e d’aria.
    Ed io son triste e solo;
    Monti e mare tu non varchi
    per tornar.
    Mia piccina,
    Fosti tutta la mia vita;
    Sei fuggita
    E non torni più.
    Sei fuggita
    E non torni più.

    English translation

    I
    Under the eaves of the old tower,
    as the almond tree blossoms,
    a friendly swallow has returned.
    Every year she returns,
    always in the same day.
    She crosses mountains and sea
    to get back here.
    Only love flees
    and does not return.
    It makes you hope in vain,
    but it does not return.
    It makes you hope in vain,
    but it does not return.

    II
    In the soft twilight of evening
    springtime is passing.
    The swallows chatter in their flight —
    they are drunk with light and air.
    But I am sad and lonely.
    You do not cross mountains and sea
    to come back to me.
    My little one,
    You were my whole life,
    but you ran away,
    never to return.
    You ran away,
    never to return!

  6. Lolita, Serenata Spagnola (Lolita, Spanish Serenade)

    Lolita, Serenata Spagnola

    Amor, amor che langue il cor
    la sua canzon ti vuol cantar
    e ti vo’ dir i suoi martir,
    le pene che Lolita può sol calmar.

    Ah vien, che i baci che ti vo’ dare,
    le stelle in ciel non le potrian contare,
    e le carezze ed i sospir
    tu sola o bella li potrai ridir.

    Amor s’en vien, è l’ora gradita,
    senza il tuo ben dimmi come fai Lolita?
    Olezza il fior e dolce invita
    o mia Lolita vien all’amor.

    Ah vien diletta, più non tardare,
    che al seno stretta ti vo’ baciare,
    ah vien diletta Lolita, vieni
    che morire mi farai se tu non vieni.

    Lolita, Spanish Serenade

    Love, love (in) which my heart languishes,
    I want to sing you a song,
    and I want to tell you (my) suffering,
    (and) the pain that only Lolita can calm.

    Come, the kisses I want to give you,
    (like) stars in sky that can’t be count,
    and the caresses and sighs, (and)
    your uniqueness or beauty, can be repeated (so many times).

    O, love comes, it’s (such) a pleasant time,
    without your goodness, tell me how to live, Lolita?
    Fragrance of flowers that breathed out, and sweet calls,
    Oh, my Lolita, comes to love.

    Ah come, dear, no more delays,
    (come) tightly closed to my breast for me to kiss.
    Ah come, dear Lolita, come
    that I’ll die if you do not come.

  7. Fedora is an opera in three acts by Umberto Giordano to an Italian libretto by Arturo Colautti, based on the play Fédora by Victorien Sardou. Along with Andrea Chénier and Siberia, it is one of the most notable works of Giordano. It was first performed at the Teatro Lirico in Milan on 17 November 1898 conducted by the composer with Gemma Bellincioni creating the role of Fedora, and Enrico Caruso as her lover, Loris Ipanov.

    Italian

    Amor ti vieta, di non amar
    La man tua lieve,chi mi respinge,
    Cerca la stretta,della mia man,
    La pupilla esprima T`amo
    se il labbro dice non T`amero

    English translation

    Love itself bars you from not loving…
    Your light hand that repels me,
    still looks for the stroke of my hand:
    your eyes exclaim: “I love you”
    even when your lips say: “I will not love you!”

  8. Vesti la giubba (English: Put on the costume) is a famous tenor aria from Ruggero Leoncavallo’s 1892 opera Pagliacci (Clowns), and regarded as one of the most moving arias in the operatic repertoire. It is sung at the conclusion of the first act, when Canio discovers his wife’s infidelity, but must nevertheless prepare for his performance as Pagliaccio the clown because “The show must go on”. The pain of Canio (Caruso) is portrayed in the aria and exemplifies the entire notion of the ‘tragic clown’: smiling on the outside but crying on the inside. This is still displayed today as the clown motif often features the painted on tear running down the cheek of the performer. Pagliacci is the only Leoncavallo opera that is still widely staged.

    Italian

    Recitar! Mentre preso dal delirio,
    non so più quel che dico,
    e quel che faccio!
    Eppur è d’uopo, sforzati!
    Bah! Sei tu forse un uom?
    Tu se’ Pagliaccio!

    Vesti la giubba e la faccia infarina.
    La gente paga, e rider vuole qua.

    E se Arlecchin t’invola Colombina,
    ridi, Pagliaccio, e ognun applaudirà!
    Tramuta in lazzi lo spasmo ed il pianto
    in una smorfia il singhiozzo e ‘l dolor, Ah!

    Ridi, Pagliaccio,
    sul tuo amore infranto!
    Ridi del duol, che t’avvelena il cor!

    English translation

    Act! While in delirium,
    I no longer know what I say,
    or what I do!
    And yet it’s necessary… make an effort!
    Bah! Are you not a man?
    You are a clown!

    Put on your costume and powder your face.
    The people pay to be here, and they want to laugh.

    And if Harlequin shall steal your Columbina,
    laugh, clown, so the crowd will cheer!
    Turn your distress and tears into jest,
    your pain and sobbing into a funny face – Ah!

    Laugh, clown,
    at your broken love!
    Laugh at the grief that poisons your heart!

  9. A song by Italian singer and composer Eldo di Lazzaro (1902-1968).

    Chitarra Romana

    Sotto un manto di stelle
    Roma bella mi appare,
    solitario il mio cuor disilluso d’amor.
    vuol nell’ombra cantar

    Una muta fontana
    e un balcone lassù,
    o chitarra romana
    accompagnami tu.

    Suona suona mia chitarra
    lascia piangere il mio cuore,
    senza casa e senza amore
    mi rimani solo tu.

    Se la voce è un pò velata
    accompagnami in sordina,
    la mia bella fornarina
    al balcone non c’è più.

    Lungotevere dorme
    mentre il fiume cammina,
    io lo seguo perchè mi trascina con sè
    e travolge il mio cuor.

    Vedo un ombra lontana
    e una stella lassù,
    o chitarra romana
    accompagnami tu.

    Se la voce è un pò velata
    accompagnami in sordina,
    la mia bella fornarina
    al balcone non c’è più.

    O chitarra romana
    accompagnami tu!

    Roman guitar

    Under a starry mantle
    I find Rome beautiful,
    my lonely heart let down by love
    wants to sing in the shadows

    A silent fountain
    and a balcony above,
    oh a roman guitar
    accompany me.

    Play play guitar of mine
    let my heart weep,
    without home and without love
    only you are there for me.

    If the phonation is a little veiled
    accompany me softly,
    my beautiful lil’bakeress
    isn’t on the balcony anymore.

    Tiber’s waterside sleeps
    while the river strolls,
    I follow ‘cause it carries me along
    and sweeps my heart away.

    I see a distant shadow
    and a star up there
    oh roman guitar
    accompany me.

    If the phonation is a little veiled
    accompany me softly,
    my beautiful Fornarina
    isn’t on the balcony anymore.

    Oh roman guitar
    accompany me.

  10. A song by Cesare Andrea Bixio

    Italian

    Sussurra il vento come quella sera
    vento d’aprile di primavera
    che il volto le sfiorava in un sospiro
    mentre il suo labbro ripeteva giuro
    ma pur l’amore ? un vento di follia
    che fugge… come sei fuggita tu.

    Vento, vento
    portami via con te
    raggiungeremo insieme il firmamento
    dove le stelle brilleranno a cento
    e senza alcun rimpianto
    voglio scordarmi un giuramento
    vento, vento
    portami via con te.

    Tu passi lieve come una chimera
    vento d’aprile di primavera
    tu che lontano puoi sfirarla ancora
    dille ch’io l’amo e il cuore mio l’implora
    dille il ch’io fremo dalla gelosia
    solo al pensiero che la baci tu.

    Vento. Vento
    portami via con te
    tu che conosci tutte le mie pene
    dille che ancor le voglio tanto bene
    sotto le stelle, chiare
    forse ritorner? l’amore
    vento, vento
    portami via con te.

    Sussurra il vento come quella sera
    perch? non torni ? primavera.

    English translation

    Whispers the wind like that night
    April wind of spring
    that touched the face with a sigh
    while his lip repeated swear
    but still love? a wind of madness
    who escapes … you as you run away.

    Wind, wind
    take me away with you
    together we will reach the sky
    where the stars will shine a hundred
    and no regrets
    I want fancied a oath
    wind, wind
    take me away with you.

    You walk as light as a chimera
    April wind of spring
    You can sfirarla that far yet
    tell her that I love her and my heart begs the
    I tell her the quiver with jealousy
    at the thought that the kisses you.

    Wind. Wind
    take me away with you
    you who know all my pains
    tell her you still love her so well
    under the stars, clear
    ritorner perhaps? love
    wind, wind
    take me away with you.

    Whispers the wind like that night
    why? do not come back? spring.

  11. Non Ti Scordar di Me (Don’t Forget About Me) is a song composed by the Italian composer Ernesto De Curtis (October 4, 1875- December 31, 1937). It is originally written for the legendary Italian tenor Beniamino Gigli (March 20, 1890 – November 30, 1957), who sang it in his 1935 film of the same name.

    Italian

    Partirono le rondini dal mio paese
    freddo e senza sole,
    cercando primavere di viole,
    nidi d’amore e di felicita.
    La mia piccola rondine parti
    senza lasciarmi un bacio,
    senza un addio parti.
    Non ti scordar di me:
    la vita mia legata e a te.
    Io t’amo sempre piu,
    nel sogno mio rimani tu.
    Non ti scordar di me:
    la vita mia legata e a te.
    C’e sempre un nido nel mio cor per te.
    Non ti scordar di me!

    Non ti scordar di me!

    English translation

    The swallows left
    From my cold and sunless country,
    Searching for Springs full of violets
    And lovely and happy nests.
    My little swallow left
    Without leaving me a kiss
    She left without a goodbye

    Don’t forget about me:
    My life is tied to you
    I love you more and more
    In my dream you stay

    Don’t forget about me
    My life is tied to you
    There’s always a nest
    In my heart for you

    Don’t forget about me!

  12. Manon Lescaut is an opera in four acts by Giacomo Puccini. The story is based on the 1731 novel L’histoire du chevalier des Grieux et de Manon Lescaut by the Abbé Prévost and should not be confused with Manon, an 1884 opera by Jules Massenet based on the same novel. The libretto is in Italian, and was cobbled together by five librettists whom Puccini employed: Ruggero Leoncavallo, Marco Praga, Giuseppe Giacosa, Domenico Oliva and Luigi Illica. The publisher, Giulio Ricordi, and the composer himself also contributed to the libretto. So confused was the authorship of the libretto that no one was credited on the title page of the original score. However, it was Illica and Giacosa who completed the libretto and went on to contribute the libretti to Puccini’s next three – and most successful – works, La Bohème, Tosca and Madama Butterfly.

    Italian

    Donna non vidi mai, simile a questa!
    A dirle: “io t’amo,”
    a nuova vita l’alma mia si desta.
    “Manon Lescaut mi chiamo!”
    Come queste parole profumate,
    mi vagan nello spirto
    e ascose fibre vanno a carezzare.
    O sussurro gentil,
    deh! non cessar,

    English translation

    I have never seen a woman, such as this one!
    To tell her: ” I love you”,
    my soul awakens to a new life.
    “Manon Lescaut is my name.”
    How these fragrant words
    wander around in my mind.
    And come to carress my innermost fibers.
    Oh! sweet thoughts,
    Ah, do not cease!

  13. Eduardo Di Capua was born in Naples in 1865. Together with the poet Giovanni Capurro, di Capua wrote the song “‘O Sole mio”, which has since been recorded by many singers, both classical and popular. He also wrote “Marie, Ah Marie” (“O Marie” in English), another Neapolitan song. Eduardo Di Capua died in 1917 in Naples.
    “O sole mio” is a globally known Neapolitan song written in 1898. Its lyrics were written by Giovanni Capurro and the melody was composed by Eduardo di Capua. There are other versions of “‘O sole mio” but it is usually sung in the original Neapolitan language. ‘O sole mio is the Neapolitan equivalent of standard Italian Il sole mio and translates literally as “my sunshine“.

    Neapolitan lyrics

    Che bella cosa è na jurnata ‘e sole,
    n’aria serena dopo na tempesta!
    Pe’ ll’aria fresca para già na festa…
    Che bella cosa na jurnata ‘e sole.

    Ma n’atu sole cchiù bello, oi ne’,
    ‘o sole mio sta nfronte a te!
    ‘o sole, ‘o sole mio, sta nfronte a te,
    sta nfronte a te!

    Quanno fa notte e ‘o sole se ne scenne,
    me vane quasi ‘na malincunia;
    sotta ‘a fenesta toia restarria
    quanno fa notte e ‘o sole se ne scenne.

    Ma n’atu sole cchiù bello, oi ne’,
    ‘o sole mio sta nfronte a te!
    ‘o sole, ‘o sole mio, sta nfronte a te,
    sta nfronte a te!

    English translation

    What a beautiful thing is a sunny day!
    The air is serene after a storm,
    The air is so fresh that it already feels like a celebration.
    What a beautiful thing is a sunny day!

    But another sun that’s brighter still,
    It’s my own sun that’s upon your face!
    The sun, my own sun, it’s upon your face!
    It’s upon your face!

    When night comes and the sun has gone down,
    I almost start feeling melancholy;
    I’d stay below your window
    When night comes and the sun has gone down.

    But another sun that’s brighter still,
    It’s my own sun that’s upon your face!
    The sun, my own sun, it’s upon your face!
    It’s upon your face!

  14. “Torna a Surriento” is a Neapolitan song said to have been composed in 1902 by Ernesto De Curtis to words by his brother, Giambattista. The song was copyrighted officially in 1905; it has since become wildly popular.

    Torna a Surriento

    Vide ‘o mare quant’è bello!
    spira tanta sentimento…
    Comme tu, a chi tiene mente,
    ca, scetato, ‘o faje sunná!

    Guarda guá’ chistu ciardino,
    siente sié’ sti sciure ‘arancio…
    nu prufumo accussí fino,
    dint”o core se ne va…

    E tu dice: “Io parto, addio!”
    T’alluntane da stu core…
    Da la terra de ll’ammore,
    tiene ‘o core ‘e nun turná?!

    Ma nun mme lassá,
    nun darme stu turmiento…
    Torna a Surriento:
    famme campá!…

    Vide ‘o mare de Surriento
    che tesore tene ‘nfunno:
    Chi ha girato tutt”o munno,
    nun ll’ha visto comm’a ccá!

    Guarda, attuorno, sti Ssirene
    ca te guardano ‘ncantate
    e te vònno tantu bene:
    Te vulessero vasá!…

    E tu dice: “Io parto, addio!”
    T’alluntane da stu core…
    Da sta terra de ll’ammore,
    tiene ‘o core ‘e nun turná?!

    Ma nun mme lassá,
    nun darme stu turmiento…
    Torna a Surriento:
    famme campá!…

    Come back to Sorrento

    See the sea how beautiful it is,
    it inspires all kinds of emotions,
    like you with people who care
    you make them daydream.

    Behold, look at this garden;
    sense, smell these orange buds,
    there isn’t a perfume so fine,
    going straight in your heart

    And you say: “I’m leaving, goodbye!”
    you’re walking away from this heart,
    from this land of love:
    do you have the heart not to return?

    But don’t leave me,
    don’t give me this torment,
    come back to Sorrento,
    make me live!

    See the sea of Surriento,
    the buried treasure it has!
    Those who traveled all over the world,
    haven’t seen anything like it.

    Behold these Sirens all around
    that look at you enchanted,
    and love you so much;
    they’d love to kiss you,

    And you say: “I’m leaving, goodbye!”
    you’re walking away from this heart,
    from this land of love:
    do you have the heart not to return?

    But don’t leave me,
    don’t give me this torment,
    come back to Sorrento,
    make me live!

Sources

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